curious about drummers....

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interestingly ive seen a lot of comments online say that the role of the drummer is to keep time, as long as the 2 and 4 beats are in place it can be manageable if they go off with a hit/note or two etc

but are there actual drummers out there whose role isnt to keep time - but is actually a creative role in another way of some kind ?

not really sure what im fully asking
other than, the drummer NOT being the time keeper, someone else taking it

perhaps genres of music where the time keeping isnt as crucial ?

maybe perhaps something like the noise artists, where theyre all making crazy sounds mashed together in an unconventional way

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@fuzzy

I'm not sure what you're asking either! 😀
There are two things here; using the drums as a legitimate instrument in the mix (like, say, Bill Bruford, whos percussion definitely plays a melodic role in the tunes while still keeping time, or John French (Drumbo) of the Magic Band, especially on the Trout Mask Replica album), and just freeform drumming for texture or atmosphere or something (like my own drumming during this summer's 50/90).
Some bands have had two drummers, one to keep time and one to provide embellishment (King Crimson on multiple occasions, or the Grateful Dead).
Is this the kind of thing you are getting at?

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yes it is ! thats what i mean
drums atmosphere texture and effects is what im after
@fuzzy whats your approach for this ?

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@fuzzy

I'm not sure this is gonna help you any...
As most of my stuff is about half-improvised, I just sit down at the kit and go for it. Sometimes I'll start out with a vague idea; "I think I'd like some delay in there somewhere...", and so I leave some space for that. Or maybe I want it cymbal-heavy, so I'll do that.
I usually start with a drum track and build the rest of the tune around it.
Often I'll use effects to change the basic sound of the drums, sometimes slightly, and sometimes it's pretty unrecognizable when I'm done with it.
Mostly just improvised no-time-signature banging!

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it does help me quite well actually....
i do a lot of things similar in approach!!
cheers 😀

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Have a look at these, too:

First, salsa. There's one person in the band who plays the "clave". That's a basic rhythm figure that holds all the rest of the percussion together. It's often played with woodsticks. That leaves the other percussionists - congas, bongos, maracas, guiros, etc. - free to improvise their thing.

Second, jazz. There's a drummer there, but they're not exactly responsible for giving a guideline. They're improvising, along with all the others. These are surely the most creative kinds of drummers. On the other hand, them not providing that basic beat can easily make the session quite chaotic.

Third, orchestras. There is no drummer there. Rhythm is provided by the conductor. Tempo is variable, and can be stretched like a rubber band. If there is percussion, such as a bass drum, or timpani, piatti, or mallets like the xylophone, they're instruments like all the others, and just play their parts. Though prescribed, their contribution can be very creative, too.

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I thought of Drumbo (Peter French) Captain Beefhearts drummer right away.

I did two electric guitar and improvised drum pieces, this 50-90. see links below...

https://soundclick.com/share.cfm?id=14471061

https://www.soundclick.com/music/songInfo.cfm?songID=14465652

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thanks for your replies peeps. its sent me down a rabbit hole!
ill be sure to hear your work @resonut123